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Jonas Jacobi

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Top Stories by Jonas Jacobi

This is a two-part blog post that discusses HTML5 WebSocket and security. In this, the first post, I will talk about the security benefits that come from being HTTP-compatible and the WebSocket standard itself. In the second post (coming soon) I will highlight some of the extra security capabilities that Kaazing WebSocket Gateway offers, things that real-world WebSocket applications will want to be fully secure. A WebSocket connection starts its life as an HTTP handshake, which then upgrades in-place to speak the WebSocket wire protocol. As such, many existing HTTP security mechanisms also apply to a WebSocket connection — one of the reasons why the WebSocket standard deliberately chose the strategy of being HTTP compatible. Unified HTTP and WebSocket Security Thanks to the HTTP/WebSocket unified security model, the following is a list of some standard HTTP securit... (more)

Akamai's Vision of the Web Embraces WebSockets

In his recent blog post, SPDY and WebSocket Support at Akamai Stephen Ludin (pictured), chief product architect talks about Akamai’s vision of the Web. Stephen discusses that at the 2012 Santa Clara Velocity conference Akamai announced upcoming SPDY and WebSocket support. He talks about the performance improvements SPDY and WebSocket bring to the table, about the possible combination of the two technologies, and points to Kaazing’s demos to showcase how the WebSocket technology is pushing the interactive web to new exciting frontiers. Head over to Akamai’s blog to read the full p... (more)

Remote Controlling a Car over the Web. Ingredients: Smartphone, WebSocket, and Raspberry Pi.

At Kaazing, we have been experimenting with using a smartphone as a remote control for quite some time now. Those familiar with our demos may have seen our Zing-Pong demo (which is a “Pong”-style game using smartphones to control the paddles over WebSocket) or our Racer demo (which is a 3D Formula One car rendered in WebGL as a Chrome Experiment, and remotely controlled with a smartphone). These demos, along with the other demos we’ve created with Kaazing’s platform, use no plug-ins. You simply point a browser on your computer to the address of the object you want to control (for... (more)

AjaxWorld Special: Creating AJAX and Rich Internet Components with JSF

This article is based on, and contains excerpts from, the book Pro JSF: Building Rich Internet Components by Jonas Jacobi and John Fallows, published by Apress. Book is now available on fine bookstores and Amazon as of February 25, 2006. JavaServer Faces (JSF) standardizes the server-side component model for Web application development but doesn't standardize the presentation layer at the browser. In a series of articles we are going to look at how JSF can fulfill new presentation requirements without sacrificing application developer productivity building Rich Internet Applicat... (more)

AJAX and Mozilla XUL with JavaServer Faces

In our previous JDJ article - Rich Internet Components with JavaServer Faces - we discussed how JavaServer Faces can fulfill new presentation requirements without sacrificing application developer productivity building Rich Internet Applications (RIA). We discussed how JSF component writers can utilize technologies, such as AJAX and Mozilla XUL, to provide application developers with rich, interactive and reusable components. In order to use AJAX and Mozilla XUL with JSF, component writers have to make sure to provide any resource files need by these technologies, such as images... (more)